Should Your Pet Travel? - WFXG FOX54 Augusta - Your News One Hour Earlier

Should Your Pet Travel?

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Some pets are not suited for travel because of temperament, illness, or physical impairment. If you have any doubts about whether it is appropriate for your pet to travel, talk to your veterinarian.

If you decide that your pet should not travel with you, consider the alternatives: have a responsible friend or relative look after your pet, board your pet at a kennel, or hire a pet sitter to visit, feed, and exercise your pet.

If a friend or relative is going to take care of your pet, ask if that person can take your pet into his or her home. Animals can get lonely when left at home alone. Be sure that your pet is comfortable with his or her temporary caretaker and home and any pets that person has.

If you choose to board your pet, get references and inspect the kennel. Your veterinarian or local shelter can help you select a facility. Read the HSUS fact sheet, Choosing a Boarding Kennel.

If you are hiring a pet sitter, interview the candidates and check their references. (A pet sitter may be preferable if your pet is timid or elderly and needs the comfort of familiar surroundings during your absence.) Read the HSUS fact sheet, Choosing a Pet Sitter.

Whatever option you choose, there are a few things to remember. Your pet should be up-to-date on all vaccinations and in sound health. Whoever is caring for your pet should know the telephone number at which you can be reached, the name and telephone number of your veterinarian, and your pet's medical or dietary needs. Be sure that your pet is comfortable with the person you have chosen to take care of him or her.

Copyright © 2001 The Humane Society of the United States All rights reserved.

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