Weather School: Volcanoes - WFXG FOX 54 - News Now

Weather School: Volcanoes

Pierce Legeion demonstrates how a volcano works (WFXG) Pierce Legeion demonstrates how a volcano works (WFXG)
AUGUSTA, GA (WFXG) -

The eruption of the Kilauea volcano on Hawaii's Big Island has created some incredible images and video. Volcanic eruptions like the one in 2018 are not uncommon in Hawaii and are always a hazard for people living there.

Volcanoes are nothing more than mountains with an opening at the top. That opening goes all the way down to a pool of molten rock below the surface of the Earth. Volcanoes form when molten rock makes its way to the surface and either erupts or slowly flows out.

We’re going to demonstrate how a volcanic eruption works with a baking soda volcano. I’ve placed a plastic bottle filled almost to the top with warm water inside a volcano made of dough.

We’ll add some red food coloring, six drops of dish detergent, and two tablespoons of baking soda. If I slowly pour vinegar into the bottle. Watch what happens. Carbon dioxide gas is produced in a chemical reaction with these ingredients. Pressure builds up inside the bottle and the gas bubbles out of the bottle. This is a good analogy for how an actual volcano works.

Copyright 2018 WFXG. All rights reserved.

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