Last minute tips for surviving Hurricane Irma - WFXG FOX 54 - News Now

Last minute tips for surviving Hurricane Irma

Helpful tips for surviving Hurricane Irma, turned tropical storm: Source: WFXG Helpful tips for surviving Hurricane Irma, turned tropical storm: Source: WFXG
CSRA (WFXG) -

Hurricane Irma has been recorded as one of the most powerful storms in history, however for us here in Augusta, we are only experiencing a tropical storm. That doesn't mean you shouldn't be prepared for the worst though. We have some last minute tips on things you need or should keep in mind while waiting out this storm.

General Tips

  • Power Inverters – If without electricity for prolonged periods of time and the only power source is a car, power inverters will allow you to use a car’s battery to run a variety of electronic devices, including phones, laptops, cameras and other appliances
  • Flashlights – As a general rule of thumb, consumers should have one flashlight per person in their household. Since flashlights use different types of light bulbs and batteries, make sure to stock up on the types that might run out of during long power outages, or consider purchasing a crank light with long-lasting LED light bulbs
  • Alkaline Batteries – Stock up on two to three sets of backup batteries, including AA, AAA, C, D and 9 volt, for every device that requires a charge including flashlights, lanterns, and smokes, fire and carbon monoxide detectors
  • Generator Starting Battery – If the battery for your home or business generator has been in storage for long periods of time, it will need to be checked to ensure it will power up during the storm
  • Candles– Battery powered candles are a safe option to provide lighting in the home; additionally, candles with matches can be a helpful back-up lighting source to prolong the life of battery powered options
  • UPS Battery Backup Systems– To keep computers and other devices running, make sure to check and replace old batteries to ensure they’ll work in the time of need
  • Backup Chargers for Mobile Devices – A protective case with an external battery pack can help keep a smartphone juiced up longer than its normal battery life. Additionally, car chargers are crucial for keeping communication lines open when the electricity is out
  • Radios & Transistors – A battery-powered, two-way or hand crank radio, plus a NOAA weather radio with tone alert are essential for staying informed about weather updates and evacuation instructions that might be announced by local authorities
  • Other essentials – Households should stock up on one gallon of water per person, per day, for three to six days. Additionally, ensure you have at least a three-day supply of non-perishable, easy-to-prepare foods such as canned goods, dry mixes and other staples that do not require refrigeration, cooking, water or special preparation. Make sure to have a manual can opener and eating utensils on hand. A first aid kit, thermal blankets, and extra toiletry/hygiene items are also important items for any preparedness kit....tips courtesy of Kristin Adomaitis.

From the City of Augusta 

  • Never walk or drive your car through standing water after heavy rain.
  • Drive safely as additional traffic could be on our local roadways.
  • Keep three days-worth of food and medication stored at your home during the storm.
  • Be a compassionate neighbor by checking on the elderly and infirm to ensure they are safe during the storm.

From the Georgia Department of Insurance:

Prepare For the Worst

  • For personal safety, identify what storm shelter is available to you and prepare an evacuation plan. Choose two meeting places: one right outside your home in case of a sudden emergency, such as a fire; and one outside your neighborhood in case you can’t return home.
  • Make a plan for your pets. Not all emergency shelters will take pets. Check with your local veterinarian for help with a plan.
  • Take proactive steps to protect your property from loss. Install storm shutters or cover windows prior to a hurricane. Be sure there is no loose siding on your home and no damaged or diseased trees growing over your home.

Take an Inventory of Your Property

  • It’s always a good idea to take photos or videos of your home before a disaster strikes to properly record the condition of the home. If you use a smartphone or digital camera, e-mail the photos to yourself, a friend or a relative or store them online.
  • Take an inventory of your personal property, such as clothes, jewelry, furniture, computers and audio/video equipment. Photos and video of your home, as well as sales receipts and the model and serial numbers of items, will make filing a claim simpler. Leave a copy of your inventory with friends or relatives, e-mail it to yourself, and/or store it in a safe location. In addition, add insurance information to your inventory information — the name of your company and agent, policy number and contact information.
  • Move all of your important documents to a safe location. Take them with you when you evacuate or store them in a safe deposit box outside the area.

Review Your Insurance Coverage

  • Review your insurance coverage. What does your insurance policy cover? What does it exclude?
  • The standard homeowners insurance policy does not cover flood damage. Check if your policy covers debris removal and sewer back-up.
  • Find out if your policy covers additional living expenses to reimburse you for the cost of living in a temporary residence if you are unable to live in your home.
  • If you have jewelry or collectibles, check the limits of coverage. You may want to buy more coverage for these items.
  • What is your deductible? You will have to pay at least this much if you have a covered loss.
  • Be sure you understand the difference between replacement cost and actual cash value. If your coverage is for replacement cost value and the cost to repair the property is greater than the cost to replace the property, the insurance company will reimburse you the dollar amount needed to replace damaged personal property or dwelling property with like kind and quality, limited by the maximum dollar amount listed on the declarations page of the policy. For example, if you own a five-year-old lawn mower that is destroyed by a fire, the company will reimburse you with an amount to purchase a new, similar lawn mower, minus your deductible.
  • If your coverage is for actual cash value and the cost to repair the property is greater than the actual cash value of the property, the insurance company will reimburse you the dollar amount to replace the property minus the amount of accumulated depreciation. For example, if that same five-year-old mower was destroyed, and the average lawn mower lasts 10 years, the company will only reimburse you for half (10 years minus five years) the cost of the item, minus your deductible.

After Disaster Strikes and Your Home is Damaged

  •  File your claim as soon as possible. Call your insurance company or agent with your policy number and other relevant information. Your policy may require that you make the notification within a certain time frame.
  • Be sure you cooperate fully with the insurance company. Ask what documents, forms and data you will need to file a claim. Keep a diary of all conversations with insurance companies, creditors or relief agencies.
  • Be certain to give your insurance company all the information they need. Incorrect or incomplete information will only cause a delay in processing your claim.
  • If your home is damaged to the extent that you can’t live there, ask your insurance company if you have coverage for additional living expenses.
  • Take photographs/video of the damage.
  • Make the repairs necessary to prevent further damage to your property (cover broken windows, leaking roofs and damaged walls). Don’t have permanent repairs made until your insurance company has inspected the property and you have reached an agreement on the cost of repairs. Be prepared to provide the claims adjuster with records of any improvements you made prior to the damage.
  • Maintain any damaged personal property for the adjuster to inspect.
  • Ask the adjuster for an itemized explanation of the claim settlement offer.
  • Save all receipts, including those from the temporary repairs covered by your insurance policy.
  • Be wary of contractors who demand upfront payment before work is initiated or payment in full before work is completed. If the contractor needs payment to buy supplies, go with the contractor and pay the supplier directly.
  • Get more than one bid. Ask for at least three references. Check with the Better Business Bureau about the contractor. Ask for proof of necessary licenses, building permits, insurance, and bonding. Record the license plate number and driver’s license number of the contractor.
  • If you can’t cover all of your expenses, contact your creditors to negotiate a payment plan.
  • If there is a disagreement about a claim, ask the company for the specific language in the policy in question and determine why you and the company interpret your policy differently.
  • If the first offer made by an insurance company does not meet your expectations, be prepared to negotiate to get a fair settlement.
  • If you believe you have been treated unfairly in getting a claim paid, please contact us toll-free at 800-656-2298 or online atwww.oci.ga.gov

From AAA

  • Be aware of the weather: AAA Members can get up-to-date weather information via AAA's WeatherFX Alert system, powered by the Weather Company, complimentary with membership. You can learn more about the alert system here. Check local traffic and weather conditions before heading out.

  • Prepare your vehicle

    • Test tire pressure: Recommended tire pressures are for cold tires. You can find the recommended inflation pressures for your car’s tires in the vehicle’s owner’s manual or on the tire information decal attached to the driver’s door jamb. It is recommended to manually check your tire pressure even if your car has a tire pressure monitoring system. This technology alerts you when one or more of your tires is 25% low - which means that your tires could still be significantly low, just not low enough for the sensors to alert you.

    • Check tread depth: Your tires are the only part of the car that has direct contact with the road, so it is important they are in good shape. To test tread depth, insert a quarter into a tread groove with the top of Washington’s head facing down. If the top of his head is not visible, your tires have at least 4/32” of tread and are fine for continued use. If you can see above the top of Washington’s head, it is time to start shopping for new tires. Take measurements in three locations across the tire’s tread: (1)outer edge, (2) center, and (3) inside edge.

    • Pack an emergency kit: bring along extra supplies such as a flashlight with extra batteries; a first-aid kit; drinking water; mobile phone and car charger; extra snacks/food for your travelers and any pets; battery booster cables; and emergency flares or reflectors. 

    • Have a full tank of gas: AAA updates fuel price averages daily at www.GasPrices.AAA.com. Every day up to 120,000 stations are surveyed based on credit card swipes and direct feeds in cooperation with the Oil Price Information Service (OPIS) and Wright Express for unmatched statistical reliability. All average retail prices in this report are for a gallon of regular, unleaded gasoline.

  • Stay up-to-date on official warnings and updates

    • Breaking news updates provided by the Georgia Department of Transportation can be found at www.511ga.org/. This site includes up-to-date information on weather alerts, evacuation routes and major incidents on Georgia roadways.

    • For hurricane preparedness information, visit the Georgia Emergency Management and Homeland Security Agency website here.

Copyright 2017 WFXG. All rights reserved.

  • Local NewsMore>>

  • UPDATE: 2 killed, 1 injured in Old Sudlow Lake Rd. crash

    UPDATE: 2 killed, 1 injured in Old Sudlow Lake Rd. crash

    Wednesday, November 22 2017 6:45 PM EST2017-11-22 23:45:48 GMT

    A Grovetown man and a North Augusta woman were killed in a single-vehicle crash on Old Sudlow Lake Road. The crash happened at around 5:50 a.m. Wednesday morning.

    More >>

    A Grovetown man and a North Augusta woman were killed in a single-vehicle crash on Old Sudlow Lake Road. The crash happened at around 5:50 a.m. Wednesday morning.

    More >>
  • TaxSlayer having job fair in Evans

    TaxSlayer having job fair in Evans

    Wednesday, November 22 2017 5:00 PM EST2017-11-22 22:00:26 GMT
    The job fair is November 30 from 9-4pm at 3003 Allen Drive in Evans; TaxSlayer.The job fair is November 30 from 9-4pm at 3003 Allen Drive in Evans; TaxSlayer.

    The company intends to hire up to 300 seasonal workers as customer support representatives at $13 an hour.

    More >>

    The company intends to hire up to 300 seasonal workers as customer support representatives at $13 an hour.

    More >>
  • Subject wanted for questioning in Bank of America forgery case

    Subject wanted for questioning in Bank of America forgery case

    Wednesday, November 22 2017 2:33 PM EST2017-11-22 19:33:41 GMT
    Subject wanted for questioning in Bank of America forgery case (source: Richmond County Sheriff's Office)Subject wanted for questioning in Bank of America forgery case (source: Richmond County Sheriff's Office)

    The Richmond County Sheriff's Office is asking for the public's help identifying a subject wanted for questioning. The man pictured in this article is wanted for questioning in a forgery incident that happened at Bank of America locations on Washington Road and Central Avenue.

    More >>

    The Richmond County Sheriff's Office is asking for the public's help identifying a subject wanted for questioning. The man pictured in this article is wanted for questioning in a forgery incident that happened at Bank of America locations on Washington Road and Central Avenue.

    More >>
Powered by Frankly