Mugshots in Georgia aren't available on law enforcement website - WFXG FOX 54 - News Now

Mugshots in Georgia aren't available on law enforcement websites anymore

AUGUSTA, GA (WFXG) -

Law enforcement agencies across Georgia were forced to remove mugshots from their website because of a new statewide law that took effect on July 1st.

Some folks told us it's horrible idea, and booking photos should be available to the public, and others tell me they think that the law protects people from companies that use mugshots for profit.  

"You're supposed to be innocent until proven guilty and by these publications like the crime report or the jail report and stuff like that, you don't know what the circumstances are," said Georgia resident, Brian Senesac.
 
Senesac agrees with House Bill 845 that makes it illegal for publications to obtain booking photos in Georgia and charge people to have them removed.
 
"I think there are people out there that actually are benefiting from other people's misfortune," Senesac said.
 
That's why if you go to law enforcement agencies website's across the peach state, you'll see that all the mugshots have been removed. Charlotte Lubert is a mother and she says she used those booking photos to stay informed.
 
"I'm protective," Lubert said. "I kind of like to know who my neighbors are, what's going on in the vicinity of the neighborhood, etc, if they're sex offenders or whatever. I just like to be aware of what's going on."
 
Arrest information and names are still available, but some say that information is useless if you don't have a face to put with a name.
 
"Pictures really help out because you can actually see what the person looks like," Quantez Williams. "If someone can see the pictures, they'll know if their family's safe from this person or that person."

Copyright 2014 WFXG. All rights reserved.

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