Barn fire in Butler County started by burning trash - WFXG FOX 54 - News Now

Barn fire in Butler County started by burning trash

(Source: Mollie Lair) (Source: Mollie Lair)
(Source: Mollie Lair) (Source: Mollie Lair)
BUTLER COUNTY, MO (KFVS) -

In Butler County Thursday afternoon, crews responded to two fires. Both started by people burning trash.

Now there is what remains of a barn behind a home on Radcliffe Lane.

It started when the homeowner burned some trash in the incinerator, but high winds got hold of it and it spread to the entire building.

A red flag warning has been issued for much of Missouri, which means fires can quickly get out of control.

"He was actually being safe," said Jeff Harwell, shift commander with Butler County Fire. "He was burning in an incinerator and just a little spark got out and started it. The humidity is way low and this wind is extremely high and causes a lot of headaches. People just don't need to burn.

This fire actually spread about 700 yards and started a second fire on a nearby hillside.

Both fires were extinguished.

The barn is a total loss but the owner says he's just happy no one was hurt.

The other fire was at Grand Avenue and Abinger Street.

It was a trash burn that got out of control and firefighters extinguished it without incident.

Copyright 2014 KFVS. All rights reserved.

  • NEWSMore>>

  • FAA orders fan blade inspections after jet engine explosion

    FAA orders fan blade inspections after jet engine explosion

    Thursday, April 19 2018 1:02 AM EDT2018-04-19 05:02:22 GMT
    Thursday, April 19 2018 7:56 AM EDT2018-04-19 11:56:32 GMT
    (NTSB via AP). National Transportation Safety Board investigators examine damage to the engine of the Southwest Airlines plane that made an emergency landing at Philadelphia International Airport in Philadelphia on Tuesday, April 17, 2018. The Southwes...(NTSB via AP). National Transportation Safety Board investigators examine damage to the engine of the Southwest Airlines plane that made an emergency landing at Philadelphia International Airport in Philadelphia on Tuesday, April 17, 2018. The Southwes...

    The Federal Aviation Administration's announcement late Wednesday comes nearly a year after the engine's manufacturer recommended the additional inspections, and a month after European regulators ordered their airlines to do the work.

    More >>

    The Federal Aviation Administration's announcement late Wednesday comes nearly a year after the engine's manufacturer recommended the additional inspections, and a month after European regulators ordered their airlines to do the work.

    More >>
  • Zimbabwe fires thousands of nurses on strike

    Zimbabwe fires thousands of nurses on strike

    Wednesday, April 18 2018 1:23 PM EDT2018-04-18 17:23:16 GMT
    Thursday, April 19 2018 7:51 AM EDT2018-04-19 11:51:54 GMT

    The country's vice president fired more than 15,000 nurses who went on strike.

    More >>

    The country's vice president fired more than 15,000 nurses who went on strike.

    More >>
  • Starbucks incident highlights perils of shopping while black

    Starbucks incident highlights perils of shopping while black

    Wednesday, April 18 2018 4:53 PM EDT2018-04-18 20:53:18 GMT
    Thursday, April 19 2018 7:43 AM EDT2018-04-19 11:43:03 GMT
    (Mark Bryant/The Philadelphia Inquirer via AP). Camille Hymes, center, regional vice president of Mid-Atlantic operations at Starbucks Coffee Company, speaks with Asa Khalif, of Black Lives Matter, right, after protesters entered the coffee shop, Sunda...(Mark Bryant/The Philadelphia Inquirer via AP). Camille Hymes, center, regional vice president of Mid-Atlantic operations at Starbucks Coffee Company, speaks with Asa Khalif, of Black Lives Matter, right, after protesters entered the coffee shop, Sunda...

    The handcuffed arrest of two black men at a Philadelphia Starbucks served as a fresh reminder of the perils of "retail racism" that African-Americans and minorities encounter on a regular basis.

    More >>

    The handcuffed arrest of two black men at a Philadelphia Starbucks served as a fresh reminder of the perils of "retail racism" that African-Americans and minorities encounter on a regular basis.

    More >>
Powered by Frankly