Cold weather could mean higher electricity bills - WFXG FOX 54 - News Now

Cold weather could mean higher electricity bills

AUGUSTA, GA (WFXG) -

As the leaves start to change colors and fall and there's that chill in the air, you know autumn has arrived and winter is soon to follow.

And the change of season could mean higher electricity bills.

"Thermostat settings are an easy way for our customers to save some money on their power bills," said Jennifer Killingsworth an energy service representative for Georgia Power.

Killingsworth suggested a setting of 68 degrees during the winter months.

"You can use a programmable thermostat to bump that setting down during unoccupied times of day or night nobody is home," Killingsworth said.

This will help with saving money but it's not just the thermostat you should pay attention to.

"Seal obvious leaks in their homes that's going to be around plumbing and wiring penetration, such as outlets and light fixtures and around doors and windows."

The use of window coverings like shades and blinds will help keep the cold air out but also allow sunlight to heat your home during the day.

And when you're not in the house Killingsworth said to turn your thermostat down or place it on an automatic cycle.

"There really is not a need for the home to be comfortable during unoccupied times. You wouldn't want to turn the unit off. You still want it to cycle on and off but it can cycle fewer times and save you some money."

A few other tips:

  • Turn off or unplug appliances you are not using for long periods of time
  • Do only full loads of dishes or laundry at a time
  • Dress warmly in the fall and winter, even indoors
  • Use a humidifier during the fall and winter; Humidity makes air feel warmer in your home
  • Install energy efficient lighting in and around your home
  • If you have a window installed air conditioner - remove it and close the window during the months of the year it is not in use.

For other tips, visit www.georgiapower.com

Copyright 2013 WFXG. All rights reserved.

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