Your Week in History: Historic home runs and legendary TV shows - WFXG FOX54 Augusta - Your News One Hour Earlier

Your Week in History: Historic home runs and legendary TV shows

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Barney, a Scottish terrier owned by President George W. Bush plays in the Oval Office. (Source: Wikimedia Commons) Barney, a Scottish terrier owned by President George W. Bush plays in the Oval Office. (Source: Wikimedia Commons)
Charlton Heston, shown here in a promotional image for Ben-Hur, was born Oct. 4, 1923. (Source: Wikimedia Commons) Charlton Heston, shown here in a promotional image for Ben-Hur, was born Oct. 4, 1923. (Source: Wikimedia Commons)
French fight pilot Roland Garros, shown here, was born Oct. 6, 1888, and died Oct. 5, 1918. (Source: Wikimedia Commons) French fight pilot Roland Garros, shown here, was born Oct. 6, 1888, and died Oct. 5, 1918. (Source: Wikimedia Commons)
Michael Durant's helicopter (Super64) heading out over Mogadishu on Oct. 3, 1993. Super64 was the second helicopter to crash on the Battle of Mogadishu. (Source: U.S. Army/Wikimedia Commons) Michael Durant's helicopter (Super64) heading out over Mogadishu on Oct. 3, 1993. Super64 was the second helicopter to crash on the Battle of Mogadishu. (Source: U.S. Army/Wikimedia Commons)

(RNN) – This week is massive. There's a lot of culturally significant moments slamming you from every direction.

Something will not get the attention and praise/scorn it deserves.

That, however, is not John Wayne, who can be connected this week to John Hoyt and Angie Dickinson.

Hoyt was born Oct. 5, 1905, and appeared in The Conqueror. His death from lung cancer in 1991 is usually cited as one of the deaths that may have been caused due to the filming location being downwind from a nuclear test site. He is more notable for his roles in Cleopatra, Julius Caesar and various TV roles.

Dickinson was born Sept. 30, 1931, and is notable for her roles in Ocean's Eleven (1960) and Ocean's Eleven (2001). She was also in Dressed to Kill, Police Woman and The Art of Love. She starred alongside Wayne in Cast a Giant Shadow and Rio Bravo where she played a gambler named Feathers who gets a little cozy with Wayne a couple of times and bails him out of a jam.

Here are some of the events of note that happened between Sept. 30 to Oct. 6.

Life and Death

We could use some political news that doesn't include the government closing or Dr. Seuss being read in Congress. I do not like political grandstanding Sam I Am. I do like it in a box. I do not like it with a fox.

George W. Bush's dog Barney liked to chase the Cat in the Hat and was born Sept. 30, 2000. Jimmy Carter was born Oct. 1, 1924, and as president was known to always keep a wocket in his pocket. Rutherford B. Hayes was born Oct. 4, 1922, but despite having an epic beard, his presidency was controversial and he would have rather been a bullfrog. Chester Arthur was born Oct. 5, 1929, and was well known for hearing a Who.

British Maj. John Andre was hung Oct. 2, 1780, a few days after his plot to take West Point from Benedict Arnold was uncovered. He was not, as is sometimes believed, hung from a Truffula tree. Samuel Adams died Oct. 2, 1803. His namesake beer goes great with one fish, two fish, red fish or blue fish.

OK, that's enough of that.

Several notable actors popped up this week. Walter Matthau (1920), Tom Bosley (1927), Richard Harris (1930) and Julie Andrews (1935) were all born Oct. 1. It's also the day in 1985 when Charlotte's Web author E.B. White died.

The alleged curse of James Dean's car started Sept. 30, 1955, when Dean died in a head-on collision. The alleged curse is explained by Snopes much better than I ever could. The crash itself it also shrouded in mystery.

Legendary comedy straight men Groucho Marx (1890) and Bud Abbott (1895) were born Oct. 2, as was NFL Films founder Steve Sabol (1942) and American Pie singer Don McLean (1945). Silent film star Buster Keaton was born Oct. 4, 1895, and Moses-turned-gun-lobbyist Charlton Heston was born Oct. 4, 1923.

Larry Fine, stooge, was born Oct. 5, 1902, the same day as McDonald's founder Ray Kroc. Tecumseh (1813), Rodney Dangerfield (2004) and Steve Jobs (2011) all died Oct. 5, and Secretariat was euthanized due to laminitis Oct. 4, 1989.

The second half of Sigfried and Roy, Roy Horn, was born Oct. 3, 1944, and was attacked by a tiger he trained the same day in 2003. Horn did not die in the attack, but a bear attack on Timothy Treadwell did kill him two days later Oct. 5, 2003.

Treadwell is the subject of the documentary Grizzly Man, which chronicles his time spent living among grizzly bears in the Alaska wilderness until one, predictably, ate him. He had even gone on the Late Show with David Letterman and been asked if it would happen. He, of course, said no.

French fighter pilot Roland Garros was born Oct. 6, 1888, and died Oct. 5, 1918, when he was shot down. Garros was instrumental in developing the interruptor gear that allowed a nose-mounted machine gun to fire between rotating propeller blades and the stadium in Paris where tennis' French Open is played is named for him.

Overlooked Anniversaries

Peanuts was first published Oct. 2, 1950, and I'll set the wayback machine to February when I went a little overboard over its conclusion.

O.J. Simpson was acquitted of a double-murder charge Oct. 3, 1995.

Walt Disney World opened Oct. 1, 1971, the Hoover Dam was dedicated Sept. 30, 1935, the Model T went on sale for $825 in 1908, the first manmade satellite, Sputnik I, was launched Oct. 4, 1957, the Beltway sniper attack began Oct. 2, 2002, and Buffalo wings were first made Oct. 3, 1964. Oct. 1 marks Yosemite National Park being established (1890), the George Washington Bridge opening (1931) and NASA being founded (1958).

Because everybody was on a different schedule in 1582, Italy, Poland, Portugal and Spain all switched to the Gregorian calendar and Oct. 5-14 didn't exist that year in those countries.

A whole rash of famous TV shows made their debut this week. The Mickey Mouse Club debuted Oct. 3, 1955, The Dick Van Dyke Show first aired Oct. 3, 1961, and Leave It To Beaver premiered Oct. 4, 1957. Oct. 5 is the anniversary of the first James Bond film, Dr. No (1962), the Beatles' first single, Love Me Do (1962), the premiere of Monty Python's Flying Circus (1969) and the founding of PBS (1970).

But the biggest of TV shows premiered Oct. 1, 1962. That was the date of the first episode of the The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson. Video doesn't seem to exist on YouTube, but audio of the show's opening is available. It features a Richard Nixon joke, advice from Groucho Marx and Carson saying "I want my mama."

Hank Williams Jr compared President Barack Obama to Adolf Hitler on Oct. 3, 2011, and his famous entrance music for Monday Night Football was removed from the broadcast later that night, never to return. Ironically, in that interview his association with the program was a prominent topic with Williams saying "it sure is fun" and hyping an upcoming game to be played in Detroit.

Something About Sports

First off, the first golf U.S. Open was held Oct. 4, 1895. It was held at the Newport Country Club in Newport, RI, and was won by Horace Rawlins.

The rest of this section belongs to baseball, and this is perhaps the most historic week in baseball history.

Babe Ruth became the first player to hit 60 home runs in a season Sept 30, 1927, but the most legendary moment of his career happened Oct. 1, 1932. In the third game of the World Series at Wrigley Field, Ruth allegedly pointed to center field to indicate he would hit a home run and then delivered.

Video of the event surfaced decades later and the only thing conclusive that it shows is that Ruth did point and then hit a home run, but what he's pointing at and why are still mysteries. It may be one of the most analyzed moments in sports history, and no one can agree on what actually happened.

Ruth himself was vague about the feat and always told the story in an exaggerated manner. The pitcher who surrendered the home run, Charlie Root, vehemently denied Ruth called the shot until his death in 1970. Ruth was being heckled from the Cubs' dugout, and it is likely he was pointing at there and heckling the team in return.

The World Series was first broadcast on the radio Oct. 5, 1921, and made its first appearance on television Sept. 30, 1947.

On Oct. 6, 1945, a man was kicked out of Wrigley Field for disrupting nearby fans. Specifically, it was his goat causing the disruption. He was angry he had to leave and said the Cubs wouldn't win because he had been kicked out of the stadium. The Chicago Cubs held a 2-1 lead in the series over the Detroit Tigers, but lost it in seven games and haven't appeared in another World Series since, giving rise to the Curse of the Billy Goat.

Roberto Clemente recorded his 3,000th and final hit Sept. 30, 1972. He was killed in a plane crash during the following offseason.

Bobby Thomson hit what has come to be known as the Shot Heard Round the World on Oct. 3, 1951, putting the New York Giants in the World Series over the Brooklyn Dodgers. The play is known for the famous radio call by Russ Hodges who repeatedly screams "The Giants win the pennant" and "I don't believe it."

Barry Bonds broke Mark McGwire's single-season home run record with his 71st home run Oct. 5, 2001. (The home run comes are the 7:03 mark of the video.) Whenever you have a chance to let Vin Scully describe something other than yourself, you take it.

The Week in Warfare

The Battle of Lake Poyang ended Oct. 4, 1363. The Ming clan fought the Han clan at China's largest freshwater lake as both were trying to take over the Yuan dynasty. It's one of the largest naval battles ever fought with close to 1 million men involved.

The Han navy was destroyed after a stalemate in the battle lasted nearly a month with the use of small ships loaded with gunpowder and burning straw being directed into the ships' hulls.

The Battle of Mogadishu was fought Oct. 3-4, 1993. During the battle, two Blackhawk helicopters were shot down by rocket-propelled grenades leading to the phrase Black Hawk Down, which was also the name of a movie based on the battle.

Two Delta Force snipers, Master Sgt. Gary Gordon and Sgt. First Class Randy Shughart, were killed while defending one of the downed helicopters and were awarded the Medal of Honor.

Holiday You Should Celebrate

October is the official month for an eclectic mix of random things, including dog adoption, awareness, cookies, country ham, drums, diabetes, pizza, vegetarianism, popcorn and sarcasm.

Oct. 2 is Name Your Car Day. I used to have a Ford Ranger that I named Harrison, as in Harrison the Ford. I challenge you to do better than that.

Preview of next week

The only World Series Game 7 walk-off home run.

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