Gadsden residents remember historic march - WFXG FOX 54 - News Now

Gadsden residents remember historic march

Two Gadsden residents reflected on the Washington, D.C. rally. (Photo: MGN Online) Two Gadsden residents reflected on the Washington, D.C. rally. (Photo: MGN Online)
GADSDEN, AL (WAFF) -

For some in Alabama, it's easy to remember what the March on Washington was like fifty years ago.

More than two hundred and fifty thousand people took place in the highly anticipated event. While the march took place in Washington, D.C., much of the pre-march planning and organizing happened right here in Alabama.

The march was the largest civil rights demonstration in history. People from all over the country were there, including James Smith and Robert Avery, who hitchhiked their way from Gadsden to D.C.

Nearly twenty civil rights leaders were scheduled to speak, but Smith and Avery said it was Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. who caught the crowd's attention. Smith said, "Once he stood up and started speaking, it just, you could hear crickets, that's just how quiet it was, you know, just drinking in his words and things."

After giving the famous "I Have a Dream" speech at the march, Dr. King was named Man of the Year in 1963 and 1964 by Time Magazine.

Copyright 2013 WAFF. All rights reserved.

  • NEWSMore>>

  • US general: Many questions remain about Niger attack

    US general: Many questions remain about Niger attack

    Tuesday, October 24 2017 4:24 AM EDT2017-10-24 08:24:54 GMT
    Tuesday, October 24 2017 7:25 AM EDT2017-10-24 11:25:37 GMT

    Questions include whether the U.S. had adequate intelligence, equipment and training, whether there was an accurate assessment of the threat in that area, and how the U.S. troops became separated in the fight.

    More >>

    Questions include whether the U.S. had adequate intelligence, equipment and training, whether there was an accurate assessment of the threat in that area, and how the U.S. troops became separated in the fight.

    More >>
  • War of words spreads to soldier's widow, Trump

    War of words spreads to soldier's widow, Trump

    Tuesday, October 24 2017 4:24 AM EDT2017-10-24 08:24:45 GMT
    Tuesday, October 24 2017 7:25 AM EDT2017-10-24 11:25:30 GMT

    "Yes, the president said that 'he knew what he signed up for, but it hurts anyway.' And it made me cry 'cause I was very angry at the tone of his voice and how he said he couldn't remember my husband's name," Sgt. La David Johnson's widow said in an interview.

    More >>

    "Yes, the president said that 'he knew what he signed up for, but it hurts anyway.' And it made me cry 'cause I was very angry at the tone of his voice and how he said he couldn't remember my husband's name," Sgt. La David Johnson's widow said in an interview.

    More >>
  • The thrill is gone ... Sears-Whirlpool split after 100 years

    The thrill is gone ... Sears-Whirlpool split after 100 years

    Tuesday, October 24 2017 7:14 AM EDT2017-10-24 11:14:34 GMT
    Tuesday, October 24 2017 7:24 AM EDT2017-10-24 11:24:38 GMT

    Sears says Whirlpool was making demands that would've made it difficult to sell its appliances at a competitive price.

    More >>

    Sears says Whirlpool was making demands that would've made it difficult to sell its appliances at a competitive price.

    More >>
Powered by Frankly