Kelly and Giffords lobby in Alaska for gun control - WFXG FOX 54 - News Now

Kelly and Giffords lobby in Alaska for gun control

ANCHORAGE, AK (AP) -

Former U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and her former astronaut husband, Mark Kelly, are in Alaska to lobby for expanded background checks for gun sales.

On Monday, Giffords visited a Las Vegas-area range and shot a gun publicly for the first time since surviving a 2011 attack.

Kelly started Tuesday at an Anchorage shooting range and shot a variety of guns and rifles.

They hope to emphasize that they support Second Amendment rights but also believe additional background checks will save lives and keep guns out of the hands of those who shouldn't have them.

The couple is on a seven-state, "Rights and Responsibilities Tour." They hope to persuade Alaska's two U.S. senators to change their votes against expanded background checks.

Tuesday's stop also includes a round-table discussion with gun owners.

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved.

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