Oil, paint, gas dumped illegally at Tempe car wash - WFXG FOX54 Augusta - Your News One Hour Earlier

Oil, paint, gas dumped illegally at Tempe car wash

Posted: Updated:
(Source: CBS 5 News) (Source: CBS 5 News)
(Source: CBS 5 News) (Source: CBS 5 News)
  • Inside WFXG.comMore>>

  • Hazardous waste collection events

    Hazardous Waste Collections

    Saturday, April 6 2013 4:14 PM EDT2013-04-06 20:14:47 GMT
    Phoenix Thursday, April 18 through Saturday, April 20, from 8 a.m. to noon at Papago Park/Phoenix Municipal Stadium at 231 W. Galvin Pkwy. (56th and Van Buren streets) Thursday, May 30 through Saturday,More >>
    Phoenix Thursday, April 18 through Saturday, April 20, from 8 a.m. to noon at Papago Park/Phoenix Municipal Stadium at 231 W. Galvin Pkwy. (56th and Van Buren streets) Thursday, May 30 through Saturday,More >>
TEMPE, AZ (CBS5) -

CBS 5 News obtained exclusive images of paint, oil and gasoline all going down the drain at a Tempe car wash.

Mark Salem opened Salem Boys Car Wash 16 years ago. He told CBS 5 News that it's the worst business decision he's ever made. Salem said about twice a month someone will dump hazardous waste down the drain in one of his bays.

"Anything that they don't want to take to the dump or they don't want to have to handle at home they'll come here, drop the tailgate and have at it," said Salem.

Pictures captured by security cameras at the car wash show a U-Haul with white paint spilled in the bed of the truck. Salem said the driver rinsed all of it out and let it seep down the drain.

There were gallons of discarded gasoline and a driver dumped oil after changing his oil in one of the bays. Instead of draining it into a pan, Salem said the man let all five quarts flow into the drain.

Randall Matas, with the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality, said illegal dumping at car washes is something relatively new to them.

"The main concern there is to human health and the individuals working in the sewer as well as the problems with properly treating that sewage at the treatment plant," Matas said.

Even though fines range from $10,000 to $25,000, when it comes to stopping illegal dumping, Matas said there is no clear-cut solution.

For Salem, that answer is just not good enough.

"We're doing everything we can to educate people that we are capable of handling the dirt off your car and nothing else," Salem said.

The proper place for people to get rid of things like oil, paint and other toxic materials are at household hazardous waste collection events. Click here for the Earth 911 database for disposals.

Copyright 2013 CBS 5 (KPHO Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved.

Powered by WorldNow