Release expected for man convicted in hotel fire - WFXG FOX 54 - News Now

Release expected for man convicted in hotel fire

CBS 5 CBS 5
TUCSON, AZ (AP) -

A Tucson man who has spent 42 years in prison for a Tucson hotel fire that killed 29 people is expected to be released Tuesday as part of an agreement with prosecutors.

The Arizona Daily Star reports that Louis Cuen Taylor is scheduled to plead no contest in an agreement that sets aside his original conviction and gives him credit for time already served.

The December 1970 fire at the Pioneer Hotel came during a Christmas party for employees of an aircraft company.

The building didn't have a sprinkler system and some people trapped in the hotel had jumped from windows to their deaths to escape the heat.

Others burned to death in their rooms.

Most died of carbon-monoxide poisoning while waiting for rescue.

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved.

 

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