Ohio voters give thumbs down to Governor's tax plan - WFXG FOX 54 - News Now

Ohio voters give thumbs down to Governor's tax plan

COLUMBUS, OH (FOX19) -

Ohio voters say 48 to 42 percent that Gov. John Kasich's desire to reduce the state income tax and increase revenues from the sales tax is a bad idea, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released Friday.

Mirroring results in other states surveyed by the independent Quinnipiac University, 90 percent of Ohio voters, including 86 percent of voters in households where there is a gun, favor background checks for all gun purchases.  By a smaller 53 to 44 percent margin, voters favor a nationwide ban on assault weapons.  Gun-owners oppose such a ban 60 to 38 percent. 

Ohio voters say 57 to 33 percent that gun ownership makes people safer rather than less safe and say 49 - 40 percent that the National Rifle Association rather than President Barack Obama best reflects their views on guns.

As the third anniversary approaches of the signing of the Affordable Care Act, so-called "Obama Care," Ohio voters say 39 to 14 percent that the new health law will hurt rather than help them personally.  Another 39 percent say it won't affect them.

Voters agree 48 to 42 percent with the idea of opening up the state Medicaid program to more recipients.

Looking at the overall Affordable Care Act, however, Ohio voters disapprove 48 to 39 percent.

Ohio voters are divided in their opinion of President Barack Obama, giving him a 48 to 47 percent job approval rating.  In terms of how people like him personally, he gets virtually an identical score, with 49 percent viewing him favorably, 46 percent unfavorably.

From February 21 to 26, Quinnipiac University surveyed 1,011 registered voters with a margin of error of +/- 3.1 percentage points.  Live interviewers call land lines and cell phones.

Copyright 2013 WXIX. All rights reserved.

  • NEWSMore>>

  • Compulsive video-game playing could be mental health problem

    Compulsive video-game playing could be mental health problem

    Monday, June 18 2018 5:20 AM EDT2018-06-18 09:20:00 GMT
    Monday, June 18 2018 3:20 PM EDT2018-06-18 19:20:33 GMT
    In its latest revision to an international disease classification manual, the U.N. health agency said Monday that classifying "Gaming Disorder" as a separate condition will 'serve a public health purpose for countries.' (Source: Pixabay)In its latest revision to an international disease classification manual, the U.N. health agency said Monday that classifying "Gaming Disorder" as a separate condition will 'serve a public health purpose for countries.' (Source: Pixabay)

    The World Health Organization says that compulsively playing video games now qualifies as a new mental health condition, in a move that some critics warn may risk stigmatizing its young players.

    More >>

    The World Health Organization says that compulsively playing video games now qualifies as a new mental health condition, in a move that some critics warn may risk stigmatizing its young players.

    More >>
  • Dunkin' Donuts store: No 'shouting in language other than English'

    Dunkin' Donuts store: No 'shouting in language other than English'

    Monday, June 18 2018 3:16 PM EDT2018-06-18 19:16:00 GMT
    Monday, June 18 2018 3:16 PM EDT2018-06-18 19:16:00 GMT
    The sign requesting customers to report non-English shouting appeared in the window of a Baltimore Dunkin’ Donuts. (Source: Dunkin’ Donuts, file)The sign requesting customers to report non-English shouting appeared in the window of a Baltimore Dunkin’ Donuts. (Source: Dunkin’ Donuts, file)

    The sign requesting customers to report non-English shouting appeared in the window of a Baltimore Dunkin’ Donuts.

    More >>

    The sign requesting customers to report non-English shouting appeared in the window of a Baltimore Dunkin’ Donuts.

    More >>
  • Trump digs in on immigration amid family separation crisis

    Trump digs in on immigration amid family separation crisis

    Monday, June 18 2018 4:20 AM EDT2018-06-18 08:20:01 GMT
    Monday, June 18 2018 3:11 PM EDT2018-06-18 19:11:57 GMT
    (Butch Comegys/The Times-Tribune via AP). U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks on immigration policy and law enforcement actions at Lackawanna College in downtown Scranton, Pa., on Friday, June 15, 2018.(Butch Comegys/The Times-Tribune via AP). U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks on immigration policy and law enforcement actions at Lackawanna College in downtown Scranton, Pa., on Friday, June 15, 2018.

    Nearly 2,000 children were separated from their families over a six-week period in April and May after Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced a new "zero-tolerance" policy that refers all cases of illegal entry for criminal prosecution.

    More >>

    Nearly 2,000 children were separated from their families over a six-week period in April and May after Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced a new "zero-tolerance" policy that refers all cases of illegal entry for criminal prosecution.

    More >>
Powered by Frankly