Lawsuit nets millions for LCD, laptop & monitor owners - WFXG FOX 54 - News Now

Lawsuit nets millions for LCD, laptop & monitor owners

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) -

That old flat screen TV you've likely replaced by now could bring you some unexpected money.

Hawaii customers can get a share of a $1.1 billion settlement paid by flat screen manufacturers. The class action lawsuit involved 10 companies including Samsung, Sharp and Toshiba.

The suit claims from 1999 to 2006 those manufacturers conspired to set artificially high prices.

Consumers rushed out and overpaid for those new TV's.

Eligible consumers and businesses in 24 states and the District of Columbia may be able to collect $25, $100, $200 or more by answering a few simple questions about the LCD flat screen TVs, monitors, and laptops they bought from 1999 to 2006.

No receipts or other documents are required for small claims.  The deadline to file a claim is December 6, 2012.

The 24 states are: Arizona, Arkansas, California, Florida, Hawaii, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Tennessee, Vermont, West Virginia and Wisconsin.

Visit www.lcdclass.com to learn more about the settlement, see if you qualify and file a claim.

Copyright 2012 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved.

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