Case could affect your ability to re-sell your stuff - WFXG FOX 54 - News Now

Case could affect your ability to re-sell your stuff

The Supreme Court is about to hear a case that could affect your ability to re-sell everything from your iPhone to your furniture.

If the court sides with the challengers to the current law you would need permission to sell anything made outside the United Sates.

According to a report in the Wall Street Journal,  the case deals with something called  the first-sale doctrine in copyright law, which allows you to buy and then sell things like electronics, books, artwork and furniture as well as CDs and DVDs, without getting permission from the copyright holder of those products.

But if the court sides with the challengers in Kirtsaeng v. John Wiley & Sons, it would mean that the copyright holders of anything you own that has been made in China, Japan or Europe, for example, would have to give you permission to sell it.

To read more about this story, click here.

Copyright 2012 CBS 5 (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

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