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Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

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Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

According to www.supremecourt.gov, Ginsburg was born in Brooklyn, New York, March 15, 1933. She received her B.A. from Cornell University, attended Harvard Law School, and received her LL.B. from Columbia Law School. She served as a law clerk to the Honorable Edmund L. Palmieri, Judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York, from 1959–1961. From 1961–1963, she was a research associate and then associate director of the Columbia Law School Project on International Procedure. She was a Professor of Law at Rutgers University School of Law from 1963–1972, and Columbia Law School from 1972–1980, and a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences in Stanford, California from 1977–1978. In 1971, she was instrumental in launching the Women's Rights Project of the American Civil Liberties Union, and served as the ACLU's General Counsel from 1973–1980, and on the National Board of Directors from 1974–1980. She was appointed a Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit in 1980. President Clinton nominated her as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, and she took her seat August 10, 1993.

On Immigration Issues

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg joined the dissent in the Court's decision in Chamber of Commerce v. Whiting. The case involved an Arizona law called the 2007 Legal Arizona Workers Act. It authorizes state courts to suspend and revoke the business licenses of businesses that knowingly hire "unauthorized aliens."

The Court held:

"The federal law allows States to take licensing action. The word ‘license' includes the many forms of legal permission to perform an act, and therefore includes charters, articles of incorporation, etc. The AZ law relies only on determinations made by federal authorities of employment eligibility, and allows employers the same good faith defense as in federal law."

The dissent argued:

The Arizona  law intrudes on Congress's balancing of immigration enforcement, burdens on employers and the prevention of discrimination, according to www.OnTheIssues.org.

Copyright 2012 CBS 5 (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved. OnTheIssues.org and Supremecourt.gov contributed to this report.

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