How do you know you’re ready to get a dog? - WFXG FOX54 Augusta - Your News One Hour Earlier

How do you know you’re ready to get a dog?

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You can learn a great deal about dogs and the adoption process by volunteering at a shelter on a regular basis. (© Hemera / Thinkstock) You can learn a great deal about dogs and the adoption process by volunteering at a shelter on a regular basis. (© Hemera / Thinkstock)
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By Jessica Bush
 

They say you're never really ready to have a baby, but the same isn't exactly true for becoming a pet parent. If you plan accordingly by asking yourself the right questions, you can be more than ready to adopt a dog.

The love a dog can give an owner is priceless. Just remember that loving companions don't always come fully trained. There are many online resources and books with extensive adoption guidelines, but the process doesn't have to be rocket science.

The biggest considerations for dog adoption should be time, money, commitment and lifestyle. How much of the first three do you have to spend on a new dog? And most importantly, are you willing to carve out that extra time and money for the training period?

Still not sure? My best recommendation is to simply volunteer at your local shelter. You can learn a great deal about dogs and the adoption process by playing an active role at the shelter on a regular basis. After all, this is a decision that will affect not only you and your family for many years, but also the entire lifespan of the dog too.

 

Jessica Bush writes daily for Dogingham.com, a blog about connecting community and nature simply by being a dog owner. 

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