Race to 18th

Race to 18th
If you look in the sports dictionary, and find the word tradition, The Masters Tournament would be the image.

AUGUSTA, GA (WFXG) - If you look in the sports dictionary, and find the word tradition, The Masters Tournament would be the image.

What creates such an atmosphere of tradition isn't just about Augusta National Golf Club or the golfers, it is also traditions for the patrons.

Masters Sunday started in the middle of the night for thousands of patrons. The moment the gates opened it a race for the patrons and their small green chairs to find the perfect spot at the 18th hole.

“This is Sunday morning at the Masters and I don’t think you can get any closer to God I don’t think than that,” a patron said.

This is a church service no one minds being in the front row, closest to the preacher. But to get the spot it takes planning and strategy.

Luke Willis of Easley, South Carolina says they thought getting here early, would be on time and didn't realize they were really hours late.

“We got here around 6 a.m., I think, and we realized we were a little late but we still got good seats,” Willis said.

“You have to walk very very fast, almost running, and try to get a spot as quick as you can...”

The main rule for patrons is walking, not running, at the property and staff will graciously remind you.

According to Masters.com, this is the first time in the history of the Tournament that the final round tee times were as early as 7:30 a.m., as well as with golfers going off the first and 10th tees in threesomes. Patrons were just coming in the gates as the first groups and pairings were hitting the links.

But once everyone got settled into Masters Sunday, it feels like a marathon, not a sprint to the end of a traditional, yet unpredictable Masters Week.

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