Report: SC has 184 open missing persons cases

Report: SC has 184 open missing persons cases
Source: VivintSource.com

MYRTLE BEACH, SC (WMBF) – A new report states South Carolina currently has 184 open missing persons cases.

That report, compiled by the team at VivintSource.com, which specializes in home security systems and home solutions, shows the Palmetto State has 3.7 missing people for every 100,000 residents.

S.C. ranks No. 31 overall when compared to the rest of the nation. Alaska ranks No. 1, with 41.8 missing people per 100,000 residents and 309 total missing persons.

Of South Carolina’s 184 missing persons cases, some are along the Grand Strand.

In August 2013, 19-year-old Zachary Malinowski disappeared from his home in the early-morning hours. Two suspects, Javon Gibbs and Christopher Brown, have since been charged with kidnapping and murdering the teen, although he has yet to be found.

The suspects in Malinowski’s disappearance have not yet gone to trial, according to a search of the Horry County Public Index.

Roughly four months later, in what is arguably the area’s most famous missing persons case, 20-year-old Heather Elvis disappeared after last being seen at Peachtree Landing.

Last fall, an Horry County jury convicted Tammy Moorer of kidnapping and conspiracy to commit kidnapping in connection with Elvis’ disappearance. She was sentenced to 30 years in prison.

Her husband, Sidney Moorer, is awaiting a second trial on charges stemming from the Elvis case. In June 2016, a mistrial was declared in his first kidnapping trial.

Like Malinowski, Elvis has yet to be found.

According to the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, more than 600,000 people go missing across the nation each year.

“While many are found alive and well, tens of thousands of individuals remain missing for over a year, and are classified as ‘cold cases,’” according to the study.

In compiling its report, the VivintSource team used data aggregated from the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System on Jan. 31, 2019. To determine the number of missing persons per capita, the team used state population numbers from the 2017 American Community Survey 1-Year estimates.

To view the full study, click here.

Copyright 2019 WMBF. All rights reserved.